Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 27th Euro Dentistry Congress Prague, Czech Republic.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Sercan Akyalcin

Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, USA

Keynote: Aesthetics Oriented Orthodontic Diagnosis and Treatment Mechanics

Time : 09:00-09:30

Euro Dentistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sercan Akyalcin photo
Biography:

Dr. Akyalcin graduated from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Currently, he serves as the director of the advanced education program of Orthodontics at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts. He has published more than 40 papers, 6 chapters and an orthodontic textbook, and has been serving on the editorial review board of prominent orthodontic journals such as Angle Orthodontists and American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics.

Abstract:

The major key to orthodontic treatment planning is to identify the direction and amount of dental movement required within each quadrant. Without sound objectives and proper planning, anchorage requirements could easily be overlooked. While cephalometric analyses are helpful in providing a rough estimate of skeletal and dental relationships, treatment goals need to be developed accordingly with the face. In this presentation, instead of using the mandibular incisor position as the primary criterion, the aim is to provide a facial aesthetics oriented treatment approach using the maxillary incisor position as the starting point while the mandibular arch still serves as the diagnostic arch. In this context, VTO is a critical tool for anchorage reinforcement together with the use of  TADs and other conventional mechanics. This is possible by customizing the required amount of tooth movement in each arch quadrant and applying the appropriate anchorage strategy for the individual. In this presentation, clinical cases will be presented to facilitate the discussion of the key concepts of orthodontic excellence by sound mechanics and the use of  temporary anchorage devices (TADs). Secondly, it is aimed to present the importance of strategic positioning of the maxillary central incisor in producing optimum aesthetics.

Keynote Forum

K.H. (Hero) Breuning

Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands

Keynote: What are the advantages of Digital planning and Custom Orthodontic Appliances in Orthodontics?

Time : 09:30-10:00

Euro Dentistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker K.H. (Hero) Breuning photo
Biography:

Dr. Hero Breuning is recognized internationally for his innovation in orthodontic procedures and appliances. He is the “inventor” of the combination of active and passive selfligating brackets. He has lectured internationally on subjects such as efficient use of selflligating brackets, indirect bonding of brackets, efficient use of TAD’s: when to use miniscrews, palatal miniscrews or miniplates? He is assistant professor 3D imaging at the department of Orthodontics Nijmegen, the Netherlands and is involved in projects such as diagnosis using digital dental models, indications for CBCT’s, digital planning of orthodontic treatment advantages of custom orthodontic appliances and intra oral scanning for orthodontic patients. Hero Breuning published many research papers and articles in peer viewed professional journals. He is a reviewer for 7 orthodontic journals. Currently, he prepares a new boek on digital planning in orthodontics, with professor Chung How Kau and professor Orhan Tuncay.

Abstract:

Orthodontic treatment will rapidly change during the next years. The use of intraoral scanners, CBCT radiographs, and 3D extra oral images, will allow the use of a “virtual head” for treatment planning and appliance fabrication. Custom made orthodontic appliances, such as individual brackets, indirect bonding, custom wires, lingual braces and aligners will allow efficient and fast orthodontic treatment.

The use of the intraoral scanner and the smartphone photographs during treatment, will allow evaluation of the treatment progress and the correction of treatment to achieve the treatment goal planned, without delay.

Patient will know the result of treatment before the actual start. Durng treatment the will be informed about the treatment progress. Off course, every treatment should be changed when needed. Monitoring during treatment will improve the progress.

After treatment, retention of the treatment result will be needed. Evaluation of treatment stability using intraoral scanners and the smartphone of the patient can be used to prevent a severe relaps of the treatment result.

Euro Dentistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Galina Dimova photo
Biography:

Specialisations, courses and participation in congresses: USA, Monaco, Spain, Italy, Austria, Germany, Greece, Turkey and more. Member of the Bulgarian Orthodontic Society, European Orthodontic Association, American Orthodontic Association and World Federation of Orthodontists.

Abstract:

Nowadays more and more adult patients are looking for orthodontic treatment. More ofter an additional correction is needed in order to restore one or more missing teeth more. Because of that the colaboration of the dental specialists is of great importance. In our practice we have many years of experience with the complex treatment of such patients. Our team consists of an orthodontist and an implantologist.
The role of the orthodontist is to decide what the treatment plan will be in colaboration with the implantologist; to choose the right mechanics; to decide what is the appropriate retention for the particular patient.

The implantologist’s role is to determine the exact medio-distal size of the space needed to restore the missing tooth; to determine the type and the size of the implant, the operative technique and the time of insertion; to select the appropriate type of prosthetic construction; together with the orthodontist determines the appropriate retention of the opened space.
We can divide the patients in need of complex treatment into two main groups – with the need of restoring missing teeth in the distal regions and missing frontal teeth.
In the distal section, we most often replace missing second premolars or first molars due to hypodontia or caries complication. We found that when we get enough space, it is not a problem to place the implant during orthodontic treatment. We do the prosthetic recovery after finishing the orthodontic treatment.
We most often recover missing upper incisors in the front - unilaterally or bilaterally. Taking in mind the difficulties we have encountered in recovering missing teeth in the frontal areas, we concluded that it is better to finish the orthodontic treatment first and then place the implants.

 

Keynote Forum

Thamer Theeb

British Academy of Implant and Restorative Dentistry, Jordan

Keynote: Minimally Invasive work-flow for Interdisciplinary Aesthetic Treatments

Time : 10:30-11:00

Euro Dentistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Thamer Theeb photo
Biography:

Dr. Thamer Theeb is a senior boarded dentist, specialized in the field of prosthodontics. He runs Doctor Thamer's Smile Studio,Dental lounge Center in Amman- Jordan and Smile Studios dental center in Bahrain. He has a part time practice in Qatar. He is a consultant for cosmetic procedures and carries out a full spectrum of treatments from facial cosmetics, TMJ problems, cosmetic dentistry, implantology and bone regeneration procedures.
Dr. Thamer is the general secretary of the British Academy of Implant and Restorative Dentistry. He lectures extensively in the field of Aesthetic dentistry and is an active member of numerous dental societies. He was a part-time lecturer at the University of Jordan. Dr. Thamer conducts many lectures and media shows dedicated towards public awareness in the field of cosmetic dentistry.

Abstract:

In the last few years, great achievements have been made in the field of aesthetic and adhesive dentistry. Meeting the patients’ desires and expectations with minimal prosthetic intervention is becoming a large issue to dentists. There are many tools and materials that can assist dentists in evaluating and achieving the best aesthetic outcomes. In this presentation, detailed analysis of the most significant clinical and technical procedures will be discussed. Starting with the clinical diagnosis and diagnostic wax up, smile test drive, and creating a harmonious occlusion with minimal restorative intervention will be described. We will review innovative sequencing techniques for interdisciplinary cases which require full mouth rehabilitation and minimally invasive approaches keeping patients' input and wishes in-mind. The key to success is to preserve the original structure of the compromised tooth and, on the other hand, involve a very low biologic intervention. 

Keynote Forum

Hikmet SOLAK

Neareast University Faculty of Dentistry, Turkey

Keynote: The pH Changes of Five Different Calcium Hydroxide and MTA Mixtures Used for Intracanal Medication and Pulp Capping

Time : 11:00-11:30

Euro Dentistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hikmet SOLAK photo
Biography:

Hikmet SOLAK has completed his PhD in Ankara University, Faculty of Dentisty in 1985 He became a Research Assistant in the Faculty of Dentistry Department Restorative  in the same year. He became an  Associate profesor in 1996  and became Professor in 2002.  In 2007 he joined  Near East University as a Founder of Faculty of Dentistry. He became a head of the faculty in 2007-2015. He became a manager for International Medical and Dental Tourism Department for University in 2015. He currently works as a menager of  International Medical and Dental Tourism departmant ans as Professor of Restorative Dentistry  Departments in Near East University, Faculty of Dentistry,. He has various published more than 60 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Chief editorial board member of repute. He is also Chief and  member of Turkish Fishing Organisation, and member of Turkish Dental Tourism Organization

His  Current Research Interests are Dental Caries Chemistry, Pulp Capping,Restoration of Endodonticaly Treated Teeth,Dental Caries Management and smiling design. International medical Dental Tourism. His  mostly indexed papers are pulp capping and caries releated studies.

 

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to determine the pH values of calcium hydroxide and MTA mixtures in combination with either distilled water, one  local anaesthetic solution,  physiological saline solution, Cholor hexidine (CHX) and Glyserine which are commonly used as a dressing materials during endodontic treatment. The pH of each vehicle prior to mix with calcium hydroxide and MTA subsequently each  prepared combination was determined using a digital pH meter. The pH measurements were determined at 3 min, 10 min, 1 h, 3h, 24 h, 48 h and 7 days. The results of this study indicated that; five different vehicles demonstrated similar pH changes range within pH 11–12 when mixed with calcium hydroxide.

While four different vehicles showed similar pH changes values  with calcium hydroxide, MTA+local anaesthetic solution mixtures demonstared lower pH change values. This finding shows us anaesthetic solutions seems not available for to prepeare MTA for dental theraphies.

 

  • Orthodontics | Restorative Dentistry | Periodontology | Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery & Innovations | 3D Imaging and Digital Dentistry | Dental Material Sciences

Session Introduction

Clare Lowe

Newcastle Dental Hospital, United Kingdom

Title: Adequate completion of radiology request forms at Newcastle Dental Hospital
Speaker
Biography:

Clare Lowe is currently in the first year of her Dental Core Training at Newcastle Dental Hospital.  She graduated from the University of Aberdeen in June 2016 with a Bachelor of Dental Surgery degree, and then went on to complete the diploma of Membership to the Faculty of Dental Surgery of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh in November 2017.

Abstract:

Objective:  The usefulness of a radiological examination and its report can be reduced significantly if the clinical background and specific problem to be answered is not given in the request.  Inadequate information can lead to mistakes in patient identification and delay in returning reports to the correct destination.  The aim of this audit was to assess current request forms to determine if sufficient information was provided.  The audit aims to ensure the quality of care provided to patients, and to identify ways to assist clinicians to provide adequate information when requesting a report.

Methods:  Data was randomly collected from 53 patient records where a radiological request was made from the Oral Surgery department using the current request forms. Forms were analysed against eight criteria and recorded as either ‘criteria met’ or ‘criteria not me’.  Data was recorded on a collection table and analysed to determine what percentage of radiology request forms could be deemed ‘adequate’, and when not, what were the failing criteria? A new form was then constructed considering the failings of the first cycle of data collection.  The new radiology request form was then used for a period of 3 months and a second cycle of data collected.

Results:  The first cycle of the audit revealed that 0% of request forms met the standard set, with 100% of forms omitting at least one of the criteria measured.  Following the implementation of the redesigned form, the second cycle revealed that 70% of all forms met all criteria and could be deemed as adequate. 

Conclusion:  The new request form has dramatically improved the way the forms are completed.  Marked improvement was noted in the information provided by clinicians on the new forms, showing that the new design helps to prompt clinicians to provide adequate information for reports to be generated.

Speaker
Biography:

I have completed my BDs from faculty of oral and dental medicine, Cairo University, Egypt and my MS.c degree in Laser Dentistry from Genova University, Italy. I have published some articles about lasers in dental applications in different international journals and have been reviewer in lasers in dental sciences journal. I have finished my diploma in lasers in dental applications in enhanced laser institute and after that I have done some studies in lasers in enhanced laser institute. I am conducting different laser courses in different places and speaker in conferences.

Abstract:

Lasers are used in soft and hard tissues treatment and can be classified to various types of laser used in treatment like He-Ne (632.5 nm), diode lasers with various wavelengths 810, 940,980, 1064 nm , Nd: YAG (1064nm), CO2 (10600, 9600, 9300 nm), Er: YAG (2940nm) and Er, Cr: YSGG (2780nm). One of the most dominant lasers that used in dentistry are diode lasers with their different wavelengths, It is important to know the  role of diode lasers in dentistry and their dental applications with different wavelengths  as treatment of haemangioma by photocoagulation is easier  with 980 nm than 810 nm as  absorption of haemoglobin in 980 nm is more than in 810.Regarding the  photobiomodulation therapy the main chromphore that used is cytochrome c oxidase, the effect of 810 nm is greater than 980 nm, and it will be more effective in pain relief, wound healing as treatment of aphthous ulcers and herpes simplex. On the other hand the energy of 445 nm is higher than 635 nm, and it will be more efficiency in cutting the tissue. Dental Diode Lasers applications are a lot as gingivectomy, oral depigmentation, frenectomy, tongue tie, treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity and bleaching. On other wise diode lasers has a great effect in endodontics and periodontology, so I will assess and appraise the effect of diode lasers in dental applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

In the contribution growths of the neoplasms (benign and malig- nant tumors and cysts), located in a system of loaded bones, will be simulated. The main goal of the contribution is to present the useful methods and efficient algorithms for their solutions. Because the geometry of the system of loaded and possible fractured bones with enlarged neoplasms changes in time, the corresponding mathematical models of tumor’s and cyst’s evolutions lead to the coupled free boundary problems and the dynamic contact problems with or without friction. The discussed parts of these models will be based on the theory of dynamic contact problems without or with Tresca or Coulomb frictions in the visco-elastic rheology. The numerical solution of the problem with Coulomb friction is based on the semi-implicit scheme in time and the finite element method in space, where the Coulomb law of friction at every time level will be approximated by its value from the previous time level. The algorithm for the corresponding model of friction will be based on the discrete mortar formulation of the saddle point problem and the primal-dual active set algorithm. The algorithm for the Coulomb friction model will be based on the fixpoint algorithm, that will be an extension of the PDAS algorithm for the Tresca friction. In this algorithm the friction bound is iteratively modified using the normal component of the Lagrange multiplier. Thus the friction bound and the active and inactive sets are updated in every step of the iterative algorithm and at every time step corresponding to the semi-implicit scheme.

Speaker
Biography:

Minh-Huy Dang has completed his MD at the age of 26 years from School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University and doctoral studies from School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University. He is the member of BK 21 Plus program, a human resource development program initiated by the Korean government. He has published 3 papers in reputed journals including Caries Research, Plos One, and Scientific Reports.

Abstract:

Fluoride-releasing materials have been widely used in dentistry because of their satisfactory esthetic properties, biocompatibility, and cariostatic properties. Furthermore, the recharge of fluoride from varying degrees of fluoride in oral hygiene products may contribute to the ability of these materials to provide a long-term caries inhibitory effect. However, little information is available on fluoride release ability of different restorative materials after short-term fluoride treatment, which simulates three times daily regular use of fluoride toothpastes or fluoride mouthwashes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference between fluoride releasing ability of different restorative materials before and after short-term fluoride treatment. Four restorative materials were used in this study: a fluoride-releasing composite resin (FRCR), a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), and two conventional glass ionomers cements (GIC). Each specimen was placed into artificial saliva (AS) and the initial fluoride ion release was measured for 10 days using a fluoride ion-selective electrode. After 10 days, each specimen was then  treated with 1,000 ppm F- for 3 min. All treatments were applied three times a day for 4 days (a total of 10 times). After fluoride treatment, the amount of fluoride re-release was also determined during the experimental period. Collectively, restorative materials with higher initial release have higher recharge capability (RMGIC > GIC > FRCR). Each different restorative material has the capacity to re-release a constant concentration of fluoride ion for 1 hour after short-term fluoride treatment. Moreover, fluoride recharge ability may occur on outer surface of restorative materials than inner surface.

Speaker
Biography:

Shrestha Takanche Jyoti has a degree course of master at the 2017 year from Chonbuk National University School of Dentistry. Currently, he is in the process of acquiring a PhD degree from Chonbuk National University School of Dentistry. He is studying on oral inflammation and implant osseointegration, published journals on oral biochemistry and oral implant in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The major causes of implant failure are poor bone quality and osteolysis in dentistry. Phellinus baumii has been traditionally used as a medicine in Korea, Japan and China.  Phellinus baumii extract exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-obesity, and anti-platelet activities. Phelligridin D belongs to the family Hymenochaetaceae isolated from the mushroom Phellinus baumii. In this study the effect of Phelligridin D loaded on titanium (Ti) nanotube implant surface for bone formation around implant were tested. The purpose of this study was to enhance osseointegration of Phelligridin D loaded implant to the bone, prevent from osteolysis support bone formation. Cell viability, crystal violet staining, western blot, alizarin red S staining, alkaline phosphatase activity, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining, micro-computed tromography (µ-CT), haematoxylin and eosin (H&E), and immunohistochemical staining were used in vitro and in vivo for the biocompatibility of Phelligridin D as a potential osseointegration. Phelligridin D promoted osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization by increased of bone morphogenic protein-2/7 (BMP-2/7), osterix, Runx-2, osteoprotegerin (OPG), alkaline phosphatase, and reduced osteoclast differentiation by inhibition of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) in MC-3T3 E1 cells. Also, Phelligridin D supported bone formation around nanotube Ti implant surface through the increment of BMP-2/7 and OPG, and confirmed by µ-CT and H&E staining in rat model. Also, Phelligridin D inhibited osteolysis molecule, RANKL. These finding support that Phelligridin D as a new compound represents a promising candidate for the treatment of implant failure due to osteolysis and poor bone quality in teeth.   

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Objective: to evaluate the stresses transmitted to the supporting structures of implant retained mandibular over-denture with different types of attachment.

Materials & methods: An acrylic model resembling the  edentulous mandibular arch was manufactured with simulated mucosa covering the residual ridge. Two implants were installed in the canine region one on each side. Complete lower overdenture was constructed on the model. Three different types of attachments were used successively; ball and socket, magnet and bar clip system.

Eight strain gauges were attached to the lingual and labial/buccal aspects of the two implants and first molar area on the right and left side of the model.

Microstrain readings were collected from the digital strain meter and statistically analyzed.

Results: When the load was applied anterioly: there was significant difference between the three types of attachments regarding stress distributions (a) on the implants with the highest stresses produced by the bar/clip attachment, (b) on the first molars with the highest stresses produced by the magnet attachment. When the load was applied posteriorly: there was significant difference between the three types of attachments regarding stress distributions (a) on the implants (loaded and none loaded) with the highest stresses produced by the bar/clip attachment, (b) on the first molars (loaded and non- loaded) with the highest stresses produced by the magnet attachment.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Muna Saed A.Abbadi  has been working as periodontist at Academic Specialized Dental Center, Jordan.  She is the member of  various associations to her credit namely Jordanian Dental Association  - GDP, DGZI German association for Implantology, Jordanian association for Implantologists, International Group for Oral rehabilitation (IGOR) and many more. She has been graduated along with Master Program in Periodontology from Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan.

Abstract:

When we define second stage procedure we mainly concern about exposure of dental implants, what to use to expose them? How long shall we wait before impression.

At the time of second stage, you expose the implants and the procedure you decide to do can help to increase the keratinized tissue around them. Ignoring the amount of soft tissue around implants will lead to discomfort and peri implantitis in future.

Evaluating the amount of keratinized tissue around the implants, if not sufficient we can increase it with simple procedures at the exposure session, better than leaving the implants with insufficient keratinized tissue which will cause peri implantitis, loss of bone and soft tissue, ending up with surgical procedures using bone grafts and connective tissue graft.

So, at the second stage session we have to know which procedure we have to do in order to expose the implants and to increase the keratinized tissue if insufficient to keep our implants free from peri implantitis.

Do it simple from beginning better than postponing to major procedures with unpredictable results.

Speaker
Biography:

NIMA SABZCHAMANARA has completed his dental study from National Medical University Kiev Ukraine. He is the student of first year of Residency program, in the Department for Therapeutic dentistry. He has published only one abstract in a dental journal.

Abstract:

Previous research on periodontal structure and function has shown a significant relationship between periodontal tissue and teeth. This study assessed dentist's beliefs about the relative efficacy of the health of periodontal tissue. A total of 505 patients in general pracrice were asked to respond to a list of 25 obligatory nourishment for a child while going to have the first teeth, for its effectiveness in dealing with patient's periodontal health especially include chewing hard food. They were also asked to select the three most effective nutrition for periodontal tissue. The imdices of patient perceived importance of the periodontal health were derived and each compared with actual effectiveness as determined from a sample of 250 patients.

Although the majority of patient's rated 18 of 25 nutrition as being very effective, there was no significant association between patient perceived nourishment effectiveness and actual effectiveness. The implications for patient training are discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Graduated from the School of Dental Medicine at Tel-Aviv University in 1982, and completed the post graduate program in oral pathology from the School of Dental Medicine at Tel-Aviv University in 1995. Currently, she runs the oral pathology services in two major medical centers (Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center in Tel-Aviv and Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus in Petah-Tikva, Isreal). She is Clinical Professor of Pathology at the School of Medicine and Clinical Professor of Oral Pathology at the School of Dental Medicine, Tel-Aviv University.
Combining both basic and clinical research, Prof. Kaplan is the author of more than 70 scientific articles, with a main interest in odontogenic cysts and tumors, oral pre-malignant diseases and oral malignancy. 

Abstract:

In the field of Oral Pathology there are several lesions which may resemble malignancy either clinically or histologically, sometimes both. 
Lesions in this group which will be presented include Adenomatoid Hyperplasia of Minor Salivary Glands, Necrotizing Sialometaplasia and Traumatic Granulomar with Stromal Eosinophililia (Eosinophilic Ulcer). 
Clinical and histological characteristics will be discussed, with emphasis on differential diagnosis. The relative frequency of these lesions in comparison with the neoplasms they mimic will also be presented, and an overview of some misleading paradigms regarding these lesions will be included.
A second group of lesions in the presentation will be malignancies imitating benign lesions. These will include peri-implant malignancies as well as some metastasis to the oral cavity and jaws from various distant primaries, which often mimic reactive lesions, as well as being the first presentation of the malignancy in selected cases. 
Data from original research will serve as the background for the presentation.

omid Panahi

Yeditepe University,Turkey

Title: DENTAL IMPLANTS ‘ Success or failure
Speaker
Biography:

Dr.Omid Panahi ,  Graduated from  Centro Escolar University on 2013  in field of Doctor of Dental Mediciene( DMD), and MSc Oral and maxillofacial surgery at yeditepe university, Istanbul, turkey. He has published  more  than 40 papers in reputed  journals and  has been serving as an editorial board member of  isi journals. 

Abstract:

Nowadays dental implants play a critical role for patients who missed their tooth or teeth and want to restore and improve his/her chewing ,speech, and some digestion problems. In this review  article we tried to find and knows the deals of dental implants success or failure. With online search about implant dentistry and, oral implantology in dental journals & specially Oral and maxillofacial surgery  journals to retrieve clinical and experimental studies, case reports & review articles by using keywords: dental implant, success and failure. There are many factors attributed to have success or occure failure during implant treatment include patient age ,the dentist experience, quantity and quality of bone implant placement and clinical protocols.

 

Ahmed Hamdy

British university in egypt, Egypt

Title: Dental photography in daily practice
Speaker
Biography:

Dr ahmed hamdy  has completed his MD at the age of 28 years from ainshams University. He works as assistant lecture of periodontology and oral medicine at the faculty of dentistry ,british university in egypt .certified implantologist from aimshams university , completed seversal implant courses in italy . He is the director of dental photography course in egypt , a premier founder of a scientific study online comunity (dentistry – origin – egypt).certified dental photographer from university of birmigiham –UK

Abstract:

Whether they are used for patient communication, consultation with a laboratory or colleague, diagnosis, clinical or legal records, or scientific presentation or publication, images are a much more powerful means of communication in the field of dentistry than the spoken or written word. However, dental photography is lacking set standards that would allow the continuity and reproducibility essential to clinical and scientific documentation. To address this need, this lecture presents guidelines for photographic documentation that will enable practitioners to produce images that faithfully convey clinical data. Precise instructions, including the positions of the patient, assistant, and practitioner; camera settings and flash positions; aiming and focal points; and the types and positions of required accessories are detailed in text and images, and an example of the desired final image is provided. This comprehensive lecture provides clinicians with all the information they need to feel confident in creating effective and compelling dental images.

Marzieh Alikhasi

Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Title: Clinical Hints of Implant Impression making
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Achieving passive fit is prerequisite of successful implant treatment. There are several factors that could affect passive fit among which impression making is one of the most important ones. A clinician should consider all these factors. For making a good impression clinician should have answer to various questions. What is the best impression material? How should a tray be, stock or custom? Which technique of impression making (direct vs. indirect) is better?  What is the best method for making an impression, implant level or abutment level? Could the implant system selection affect impression making? Do special cases need modified impression technique? How impression materials should be manipulated to achieve a good impression? If implants are in tilted direction, should the impression method be changed? What is the role of radiographs in making an appropriate impression? This lecture aims to discuss about these questions by presenting cases and articles.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Transplantation is the best treatment for organ failure.(1) However  the patients who have to undergo transplantation should wait for a long time, and this  might contribute to developing  some complications.. Moreover, after excessive search in medical journals, we found that previous studies mostly have focused on the oral cavity in the transplant patients, in chronic renal failure and in liver disease, however, there are few studies which evaluate dental health status and radiographic evaluation in liver failure or renal failure patients.This motivated us to conduct the present study to compare the renal failure and liver failure patients with normal people with regard to the findings of oral cavity and oral plain radiography.

Methods:

This is descriptive study conducted on the patients with chronic renal or liver failure who were registered for transplantation on the waiting list,in Nemazee hospital transplant center. Oral examinations and oral plain graphy were requested. Having consulted the statistic professor,we assign the participants to three groups : choronic renal failure CRF (n:50), liver disese (n:50), and normal group (n:50). The data were entered in SPSS and were analyzed.

Results:

The three groups participated in the present study were the normal group (n:50), CRF group (n:50), and liver failure (n:50) group. Gingival recession was observed in 16, 23, and 33 patients in Normal, CRF group, and liver failure group respectively (P.value<0.05). We also noticed   bone loss in 13, 23, and 29 patients in normal group, CRF, liver failure group (p.value: 0.002).

The mean number  for missing teeth, the teeth needed extraction, the teeth needed root canal therapy, the teeth for which root canal therapy had alrady  been performed, the teeth that had been filled before the study , and the teeth in need of  filling for the liver failure group was more than that in the normal group. ( The P.value was <0.05), however,the mean  for CRF group was significantly lower  than that for the  normal group (p.value<0.05). compared with the normal group The mean number  for missing teeth in CRD group was significantly higher.

Conclusion:

Gingival recession and bone loss in liver failure and chronic kidney disease group  were significantly more than that in the  normal group.The prevalence of caries was lower in CRF patients compared with the normal group;in contrast,missing teeth,filled teeth.dental filling and root canal therapy were lower in the liver failure patients than that in  the normal group. Missing teeth was more prevalent in chronic kidney disease than normal group.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Objective: To evaluate speech impairment due to the placement of fixed labial orthodontic appliances
Material and methods: This experimental study was conducted at orthodontic Department of Children Hospital and ICH Lahore. Data was collected from patients coming to Orthodontic Department of Children Hospital Lahore. 26 patients were taken through convenient sampling technique. Patients were selected for treating with Labial orthodontic appliance using GTPI (the Grainger’s Treatment Priority Index) scale. Data is collected with the help of demographic sheet, a specifically designed questionnaire which includes five question items, and two groups of phonemes from IPA-Chart. A set of consonant and certain bilabial sounds, which are directly or indirectly influenced by placing labial appliance, were selected. Patients were asked to pronounce the sounds and speech samples were recorded in the form of a video prior to as well as immediately after placing the appliance.Patients were recalled 2 weeks later and speech sample was recorded. Patient was recalled 1 month after last appointment and speech sample was recorded again. Dental/skeletal variables were correlated with the ability to accommodate the presence of the appliances
Results: Appliance effects were variable: 11% of the subjects were unaffected, 83% were
temporarily affected but adapted within 1 months, and 34% of patients showed persistent sound
errors at 1 months. Maladaptation to appliances was correlated to severity of malocclusion as determined by GTPI. Labio-dental sounds, most notably /f/, were affected most often.
Conclusions: Insertion of fixed labial appliances has adverse effect on speech sound production. Labio-dental and bilabial sounds are most compromised among all the IPA-Chart sound groups, with /f/ being affected most often. Accommodation to fixed appliances depends on the severity of malocclusion.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

This prospective study was conducted at the dental clinics of a university hospital   over a six months period. A total of 115 metal-ceramic crowns were evaluated prior to the cementation, using non-probability convenience sampling technique. All crown preparations were performed by restorative dentistry residents under supervision of specialists followed by impression of the preparations with addition type silicon rubber material. All crowns were made by a single laboratory technician.  Each crown was evaluated by the  resident on their respective dies and Then clinical  examinations were conducted by seating the crown on the tooth prepation and  visual assessment was done  by using sharp explorer along margins of crowns. Those crowns which were found to be accurate without any clinically detectable marginal discrepancy were evaluated on bitewing radiograph and any discrepancy at proximal surfaces of tooth was noted. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 22. Chi-square and odds ratio was used to determine and measure the association of marginal discrepancy with tooth locations and tooth surfaces.

RESULTS:

Two hundred and thirty  interproximal crown surfaces were evaluated on radiographs. One hundred and thirteen (49.1%) surfaces had marginal discrepancies; 44 surfaces (19.1%) had horizontal discrepancies, 58 (25.2%) surfaces had vertical discrepancies and 11 surfaces (4.8%) had both horizontal and vertical discrepancies. Horizontal crown marginal discrepancies were most commonly associated with maxillary teeth (OR 3.0) and mesial surfaces of crowns, whereas, vertical discrepancies were most commonly associated with distal surfaces of crowns of both maxillary and mandibular teeth(OR 8.2)

CONCLUSIONS:

According to the results of this study, almost half of the crowns that were considered as clinically acceptable at the margins had marginal discrepancy on radiographic  evaluation; with vertical discrepancies mainly observed in distal surfaces of all crowns and horizontal discrepancies mainly on the mesial margins of the maxillary crowns.